It’s That Time of Year

Well it’s that time of year.

NaNoWriMo is in full swing and I forgot about it. Sad face.

I started a story a few days late, but it already needs a heavy rewrite, so I may end up scrapping it. To be honest it would best be served as a graphic novel. If anybody wants to tackle some panel drawing let me know.

Thanksgiving is coming up, followed by Christmas and the New Year. I’m already knee deep in ‘things’ between church and home and planning the 1000 trips my family will have to take. It’s very taxing already. My writing has been on the back burner for months because of the baby and work and editing and designing and everything else. That short story collection I’ve been talking about releasing for the better part of a year may someday become a reality.

But the point is that we all get busy.

1. Find something to do

This blog has kept up my spirits and work ethic, if albeit slightly. I find myself trying to write a post at least twice a month if not once a week. Sometimes it’s hard, but it keeps me going. Researching and having to go out and watch movies for reviews and stuff helps me stay sharp in my mind for future projects. Finding the time to develop these things while not having a full-time writing avenue is difficult, but the creative juices are still flowing.

2. Find other things to do

If you read this blog religiously you know that I’m an avid hunter and fisherman. Well I used to be an avid fisherman. Hunting season is in full swing, and I will be tracking down an elk pretty soon. And there will be pictures of my conquest. Hunting helps me get away from all the stressful stuff and have some alone time. I’m an INTP person, so getting away is extremely important to me. If I was still single, I would probably spend my weekends in another state. Hunting also helps me with self worth issues because it provides much needed meat for my family.

I digress.

Find something to do that isn’t writing to help you chill out and relax. Relaxation often leads me to ideas that I can write down and develop later.

3. Do some writing

As i mentioned earlier, I had planned to do NaNoWriMo again this year. That didn’t happen. But I did start writing a story and have a pretty good idea of where I want it to go. Not very solid yet, but it’s a start. If you’re stuck just writing a blog or you’re done relaxing and have some ideas, try to write a little bit. Who knows, maybe you’ll bang out the next great thing. Maybe collaborate with someone. Do some sort of writing. You’re bound to come out of your funk eventually.

 

This is a post that is similar to many i have already written, and is mostly a reminder for myself and anyone in the same boat. It will end. The ideas will come. The words will make it onto the screen. Get it done.

Keep it up.

Ender’s Game

http://collider.com/wp-content/uploads/enders-game-promo-poster.jpg

 

I saw “Ender’s Game” this weekend. I was both thrilled and disappointed. As I watched the movie, I had several thoughts on story and medium.

 

SPOILERS BELOW!!!!!

 

Subplots can be make or break

If you have read the novel Ender’s Game, you know that the story is pretty complicated. In fact, one subplot is so vital to the story that it effects the end of the novel and its sequels. Ender’s siblings engage in political espionage and fearmongering, eventually leading to a global unification and takeover. This in turn allows Ender to take a team of explorers and find a new planet to colonize, leading to him finding an egg containing a “queen” alien. This gives Ender a chance at redemption for the genocide he committed.

The movie is devoid of this plot. In fact they take all of the things it leads to and kind of rolls them into one sorry excuse for an end of a movie. It ceased to be a well thought out plot and became a rushed, “let’s make this movie less than 2 hours” piece of garbage. The falling action of the movie is quite literally about ten minutes long. the falling action of the novel is at least 50 pages.

 

Medium

All of this being said, I understand that it is nearly impossible to get everything in a novel on film. Every movie would probably be 4 hours long, minimum, which is not conducive to an ADD audience. However that shouldn’t be an excuse to ruin or almost ruin a story. Film is a wonderful medium, in fact it’s probably my favorite medium. I love visuals, seeing the action as opposed to imagining it. But the written word allows a complete description and longer story. The reader is saddened when the story ends, whereas a movie ending is just another part of the experience. Seldom have I heard a general public outcry of “I didn’t want the movie to end” (crappy Hallmark movies and grandmothers aside.)

What does this mean for writers? We have the opportunity to complete a story without making compromises. A story can be as long (or short) as it needs to be, without the restraint of running time. Let’s use this to our advantage, and write better stories. If I ever sell a story property for film, I hope everyone says that it was as good as the book, but I would definitely take “The book was better.”

 

Aside from it’s differences in subplots, “Ender’s Game” was visually stunning, and it did get some of the story aspects right. The battle room, in my opinion, was spot on (even though the story was shortened). Go see the movie, and for your own opinions. If you haven’t read the book, I highly recommend it. Remember that it was written in the 1980’s, predicting things that are commonplace in our lives such as the internet and very immersive video games. All in all, I give the movie a solid B.